Goddess of Light: Go read Goddess of Spring instead

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviewsbook review PC Cast Goddess of LightGoddess of Light by P.C. Cast

Workaholic interior designer Pamela is on a business trip to Las Vegas. Reeling from an abusive marriage, she’s hoping her heart isn’t entirely dead yet. She accidentally weaves her desire for romance into a spell binding the goddess Artemis to her aid, and Artemis sends her brother Apollo to woo Pamela.

Apollo and Pamela fall in love, of course. I didn’t think their relationship was developed as well as Lina and Hades’ relationship in Goddess of Spring. It seemed more like Apollo and Pamela fell into bed a couple of times and then declared themselves soul mates. Besides, I can’t see Apollo as a romantic hero. There is one point where Pamela muses about how Apollo isn’t going to stifle her as her husband did. Hello? Burning Coronis to a crisp for cheating on him? Chasing Daphne till she had no choice but to turn into a tree? Punishing Cassandra for not wanting to sleep with him? He comes off as rather piggish in myth, and none of that is really dealt with except for a few offhand comments about how he’s not the same guy anymore because his love for Pamela has changed him. In under a week? I doubt it. It’s just, BANG! he’s a nice guy now, without a single iota of his former personality resurfacing. At least Hades, for all his brooding darkness, always seemed in the stories to actually love his wife. And the angsty aspect of his personality was also a plot point in the novel, and an obstacle to his relationship with Lina. Here, Apollo is perfect beyond belief. I also can’t really buy Artemis as a promiscuous blonde bombshell.

And the ending seemed wrong, too. Let’s just say, for fear of spoilers, that the characters seemed a lot less interesting at the end, particularly Pamela.

Ancient gods Artemis and Apollo get caught up in a game of love with a mortal woman in this Goddess Summoning novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author P. C. Cast… Tired of dating egomaniacs, interior designer Pamela Gray has nearly given up. She wants to be treated like a goddess—preferably by a god. As she whispers her wish, she unwittingly invokes the goddess Artemis, who has some tricks up her celestial sleeve… Twins Artemis and Apollo have been sent to the kingdom of Las Vegas to test their mettle. Their first assignment: make Pamela’s wish come true. So Artemis volunteers her golden brother. After all, who better than the handsome God of Light to bring love to this lonely woman? It might be a first, but here in Sin City, where life is a gamble, both god and mortal are about to bet on a high-stakes game of love…

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KELLY LASITER, with us since July 2008, is a mild-mannered academic administrative assistant by day, but at night she rules over a private empire of tottering bookshelves. Kelly is most fond of fantasy set in a historical setting (a la Jo Graham) or in a setting that echoes a real historical period (a la George RR Martin and Jacqueline Carey). She also enjoys urban fantasy and its close cousin, paranormal romance, though she believes these subgenres’ recent burst in popularity has resulted in an excess of dreck. She is a sucker for pretty prose (she majored in English, after all) and mythological themes.

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