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SFF Author: Laurell K. Hamilton

Laurell K. Hamilton review(1963- )
Laurell K. Hamilton is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of two series that mix mystery, fantasy, magic, horror and romance. There are now more than 6 million copies of Anita Blake in print worldwide, in 16 languages. Hamilton’s Ballantine series features Fey princess and private investigator, Merry Gentry. Laurell K. Hamilton lives in St. Louis County Missouri with her husband Jonathon Green, daughter, one pug dog and one boxer/pug dog. Visit Laurell K. Hamilton’s website.



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The Killing Dance: LKH really blows it on this one

The Killing Dance by Laurell K. Hamilton

I enjoyed ANITA BLAKE, VAMPIRE HUNTER up to this point, but Laurell K. Hamilton really blows it on this one. Anita has turned into a hypocrite and any claim she had to integrity was shredded within the first 3 chapters of the next book. Hamilton has destroyed her main character — Anita is turning into a nasty tramp. We are talking about a complete reversal of the sharp-edged but relatively moral person she started out as. What a shame.

I should admit that The Killing Dance must have been well conceived and written because it really affected me — I was utterly devastated.


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Narcissus in Chains: Turning into a soap opera

Narcissus in Chains by Laurell K Hamilton

Like an addiction to pain, I have kept reading Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter despite having some serious issues with what Laurell K Hamilton has done with her characters. She seriously pisses me off with the way that she is developing the Richard-Anita relationship.

Anita has turned from a virtuous woman into a tramp. She just keeps getting worse and her apparent ability to get past becoming a whore is just ridiculous. Her ability to remain a true believer despite all the dark forces at work has been one of her truly redeeming characteristics.


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Cerulean Sins: Someone needs to give LKH some help

Cerulean Sins by Laurell K. Hamilton

Cerulean Sins is book 11 in Anita Blake’s story and Anita is disgusting at this point. Whatever the excuse, she is a total tramp and has finally embraced it. That is so ridiculous for a character who kept Richard and Jean-Claude waiting for months without giving in to them. Maybe Laurell K. Hamilton’s editor told her that the books need more sex to be interesting because there is no good explanation otherwise.

The storyline is still interesting if you just want to know how things will turn out,


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Incubus Dreams: Yuck! Typical for the most recent books

Incubus Dreams by Laurell K. Hamilton

LKH has continued down the path that she has chosen for this series: the characters just get trashier with each book and all of the redeeming features that made them respectable are disappearing.

The sad part is that it is such a flawed perspective on people. Some people are actually able to resist being corrupted by outside influences and that is totally absent from this series where everyone is so caught up in a need for sex and power that they will totally debase themselves to get it.


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Blood Noir: Too much drama, too little actual plot

Blood Noir by Laurell K. Hamilton

I probably shouldn’t be plodding on through this series at all. I haven’t truly enjoyed an Anita Blake book in years. Lack of editing hasn’t done the series any favors, and while I don’t mind sex in novels, Laurell K. Hamilton still hasn’t figured out that sometimes you can gloss over periods of time when nothing much is happening plotwise. (“Three weeks later…”)  I don’t need a play-by-play every time the characters get it on. It just fills up pages and crowds out the plot.


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Skin Trade: There’s actually a plot

Skin Trade by Laurell K. Hamilton

Skin Trade is enough of a step in the right direction that I’m sorely tempted to give it a higher rating than it actually deserves. There’s a plot! With murders! And investigating! And I turned out to be right about Marmee Noir’s plans for Anita. And the two explicit sex scenes are better-written and less icky than what I’ve come to expect from Laurell K. Hamilton. And she’s being copy-edited again, so there are only a few typos.


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Flirt: Anita’s bevy of boyfriends is becoming a literary problem

Flirt by Laurell K. Hamilton

I never thought I’d be nostalgic for Micah. Back then, it seemed a little much to charge mass market paperback price for a novella. Enter Flirt: a novella in hardback. This is one case where the format of the book affects the star rating. Flirt would be much more palatable in an anthology, or even as a mass market paperback. At hardback price, I can’t recommend it.

The early chapters are a mix of the interesting and the tedious.


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Bullet: Adieu, Anita

Bullet by Laurell K. Hamilton

Bullet begins with Anita slipping backstage at a dance recital. Her former friend Monica forgot the hat for her son’s costume, so Anita brings it to her, and the two women have a bit of a spat. Then, in chapter two, Anita sits down to watch the performance with her various boyfriends and —

Wait.

When I was a preteen, I used to read the BABY-SITTERS CLUB series. There’s one cardinal rule for reading BSC books: Skip chapter two.


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A Kiss of Shadows: Not my cup of mead

A Kiss of Shadows by Laurell K. Hamilton

Laurell K. Hamilton promises a story of modern-day faeries and their complex court intrigue, which in theory is right up my alley, but I didn’t really get into A Kiss of Shadows.

By about page 100, my significant other was laughing because I kept yelling aloud, “Is she going to sleep with HIM, TOO?” The entire plot of the book seems to consist of Merry’s sexual adventures. That would be OK if it were good erotica,


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The Living Dead: Zombies aren’t the point

The Living Dead edited by John Joseph Adams

I never knew there were so many ways to tell a zombie story. I pretty much thought that the George Romero version was it — dead people wandering around holding their arms out in front of them and calling out “braaaaaaains,” looking to munch on the living. I never did know why they had to hold their arms that way, but they all did — I thought.

John Joseph Adams has chosen his material wisely in The Living Dead,


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Next SFF Author: Peter F. Hamilton
Previous SFF Author: Kersten Hamilton

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