Sunday Status Update: December 16, 2012

This week, Phèdre no Delaunay, that most eloquent of courtesans…

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Brad: This week was spent reading mostly papers and assignments for the end of the semester. I think this coming week will be very similar. After that, I have a few weeks to focus on reading and writing reviews.

SHORT STORIES:
H.P. Lovecraft
*”The Haunter of the Dark”
*”The Colour out of Space”
“Poetry of the Gods”
(I also read several comic book translations of stories by Lovecraft. Perhaps soon I can give a review that provides an overview of Lovecraft in comics.)

COMICS:
*reread Atomic Robo, Volume One by Brian Clevinger
*Neil Gaiman‘s Murder Mysteries adapted for comics and drawn by P. Craig Russell.
Stumptown, Volume Two, Issue #4 by Greg Rucka
*Before Watchmen: Minutemen Issue #5 by Darwyn Cooke
Point of Impact, Issue #3 (of 4) by Jay Faerber
Winter Soldier, Issue #13 by Ed Brubaker
The Incredible Hulk, Volume 2, Issues #77-81

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Kat: This week I read three audiobooks, none of them particularly exciting: The Beyond by Jeffrey Ford (not as good as the first two books in his WELL BUILT CITY trilogy) and books 2 and 3 in Edgar Rice Burroughs’ CASPAK trilogy, The People that Time Forgot and Out of Time’s Abyss. It’s been fun watching my 16 year old son, Nate, enjoying reading again. He’s been banished (by me) from League of Legends until his grades improve, so he read The Hobbit last week and is half way through The Fellowship of the Ring. He started the trilogy years ago but didn’t finish.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Phèdre: This week, I read a rather quaint little codex called the Kama Sutra. It was doubtless penned by some enthusiastic novice, and had made several adorable errors which I corrected in the margins. For the present, I have decided to ignore a pointed gift from Joscelin, Karate for Dummies. It’s true that we’re constantly being captured and embroiled in hand to hand combat, but the prospect of wrestling with sweaty strangers just seems so outside my comfort zone.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Rebecca: I’ve just finished reading the last two books in Scott Westerfeld’s fantastic steampunk LEVIATHAN trilogy: Behemoth and Goliath. They’re both wonderfully imaginative, with actual WWI history blended with Westerfeld’s own ideas. My reviews for both of them are forthcoming. Next up is a collection of YA fantasy: Trollbridge by Jane YolenAurelie by Heather Tomlinson, and (after rave reviews on this very site) The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne Valente. So it looks like I’m all set for my holiday reading!

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Steven: A very busy week at school, but I did get to read some of The Jack Vance Treasury, a collection of Vance‘s short stories and novellas. Finished “Liane the Wayfarer,” a DYING EARTH story, and “Sail 25” one of his older stories that’s pretty good, about a group of space cadets on a training voyage on a solar powered space ship commanded by a crotchety old astronaut. One of his more memorable characters.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Terry: I’ve been battling demons all week (you should see me in my black leather get-up), so I didn’t get much reading done. I managed to finish Whispers Underground, by Ben Aaronovitch, and will shortly be writing reviews of all three of his PETER GRANT books. I can’t wait for the next one, Broken Homes, which is due next year. I started reading A Fantasy Medley 2edited by Yanni Kuznia. The first novella in the book, by Tanya Huff, was disappointing — apparently it only makes sense if you’re familiar with a world she’s written about at length, and I’m not. I’m hoping the other three novellas, by Amanda DownumJasper Kent and Seanan McGuire (the last one of my all-time favorites, as faithful readers may recall), will be more to my taste.

fantasy book reviews science fiction book reviews Tim: This week I finished up with J.R.R. Tolkien‘s The Hobbit yet again (I’m almost sure I can recite it from memory now), and also got into Elizabeth Moon‘s The Deed of Paksenarrion. I’m most of the way through it now (the omnibus edition), and I’m very much enjoying it. Paks is a great example of how more female fantasy heroes should be done (that is, an admirable heroic figure with not even the whisper of a “Red Sonja” vibe attendant on the proceedings), and while Moon’s world clearly owes a lot to D&D, it’s all nicely plotted and described.


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TIM SCHEIDLER, who's been with us since June 2011, holds a Master's Degree in Popular Literature from Trinity College Dublin. Tim enjoys many authors, but particularly loves J.R.R. Tolkien, Robin Hobb, George R.R. Martin, Neil Gaiman, and Susanna Clarke. When he’s not reading, Tim enjoys traveling, playing music, writing in any shape or form, and pretending he's an athlete.

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7 comments

  1. Phèdre, I read the Kama Sutra, too — it is free for the Kindle. Please tell me where the errors are so I can correct my version.

    Terry, I find that red leather works better, unless you are battling the kind of demons who have green blood. Then you kind of end up looking like a Christmas tree.

  2. Red leather! Why didn’t I think of that! Red’s my favorite color, after all.

    And dang it, the requisite long, polished fingernails just don’t work for me. It’s too hard to type.

  3. Terry, I find the slide-on Wolverine-like adamantium claws work well and Lee’s Press On Nail has a lovely accessory set just for them.I’m partial to the leopard-print, myself.

    I’m reading The Magician King by Lev Grossman, but mostly embroiled in family health/holiday/work stuff these days.

    • Ah, I’ll have to look for the leopard print. My CVS doesn’t carry that style and last time I made the mistake of purchasing the color called “Ferocious Fuchsia.” This clashed with my red leather and I was really embarrassed when one of my enemies pointed it out.

  4. Aw, Phedre, you don’t need karate as long as you have hair sticks. ;)

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